Pursuing a reliable calculation of binding affinity.

The relevance of uncertainties.

 

The reliable determination of binding constants (Ka) and enthalpies (ΔH) from Isothermal Titration Calorimetry depends, among other aspects, on the quality of the thermogram recorded where a high signal-to-noise ratio is pursued to get a trusty isotherm. Low signal-to-noise ratio conducts to less precise integration of the thermogram peaks and, consequently, to a binding isotherm defined by points with larger related uncertainties. Logically, the uncertainty associated to the integral points will significantly affect the determination of the thermodynamic parameters and should not be set aside through the data analysis.

Here´s an illustrative example of two ITC experiments of the interaction between Carbonic Anhydrase II (CA) and 4-carboxybenzenesulfonamide (4-CBS) that yielded thermograms of different quality (Fig 1*).

Fig.1 ITC titrations of 4-CBS into CA. a) Exp1, higher signal-to-noise ratio; b) Exp2, lower signal-to-noise ratio.

Data fitting to a 1:1 binding model was performed for both experiments and for comparison purposes the analyses were conducted twice, taking into account the uncertainties associated to the calculation of the peaks integral (weighted fitting) and not considering them (all the points having the same weight).
The results show a larger discrepancy in the Ka values obtained from Exp2, depending on whether or not the uncertainties are included in the fitting. Besides, the Ka obtained from the weighted fitting of Exp2 is significantly closer to the corresponding Ka value of the weighted fitting of Exp1 (Figure 2).
Fig.2 KA, DH and rM (correction parameter for CA concentration in the cell) values from fitting of Exp1 and Exp2 a) without uncertainties and b) with uncertainties. The bar diagrams show the comparison between KA values of Exp1 and Exp2.

 

The main origin of this difference is the large uncertainty associated to the mid-titration point, which consideration has an effect on the final Ka value (Figure 3).
Fig.3 Fitted isotherm from Exp 2. Redline: theoretical curve calculated when considering uncertainties; black line: theoretical curve calculated with no uncertainties.

 

Being aware of the relevance of weighting data points based on their uncertainty AFFINImeter includes, into the raw data processing step, the automatic determination of uncertainties in the peaks integration and the possibility to perform weighted fitting for a more reliable analysis. Another good reason to work with AFFINImeter!

 

KinITC for TA and MicroCal Calorimeters – New version Release!

During the last months we’ve contacted you asking your opinion and experience with the software. Thanks to all your suggestions and comments we have improved the previous version of the software to make it easier, faster and more versatile.

What’s new in AFFINImeter?

  • Availability of KinITC for TA and Microcal data files.
  • Inclusion of Multi Temperature Analysis: Van’t Hoff and Eyring plots
  • The project management section has improved, now you can easily organize your projects in Folders/Subfolders and move them from one to another.

 

Easier, Faster and more Versatile!

In this new version you will find several changes adressed to improve the user experience of the software, adding more features, making it easier and faster to user, and more versatile.

 

Go to the software!

Extending ITC to Kinetics with kinITC

 

Title: Extending ITC to Kinetics with kinITC

Authors: Philippe Dumas, Eric Ennifar, Cyrielle Da Veiga, Guillaume Bec, William Palau, Carmelo Di Primo, Angel Piñeiro, Juan Sabín, Eva Muñoz, Javier Rial.

Abstract:

Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has long been used for kinetic studies in chemistry, but this remained confined to enzymatic studies in the biological field. In fact, the biological community has long had the tendency of ignoring the kinetic possibilities of ITC considering it solely as a thermodynamic technique, whereas surface plasmon resonance is seen as the kinetic technique par excellence. However, the primary signal recorded by ITC is a heat power which is directly related to the kinetics of the reaction. Here, it is shown how this kinetic signal can be recovered by using kinITC, the kinetic extension of ITC. The theoretical basis of kinITC is detailed for the most common situation of a second-order reaction A + B Ω C characterized by kinetic parameters kon,koff. A simplified kinITCETC method based upon the determination of an “Equilibration Time Curve” (ETC) is presented. The ETC is obtained by automatic determination of the “effective end” of each injection. The method is illustrated with experimental results with a comparison to Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) data. kon values were obtained in a wide range, from 103 to 0.5 × 106 M− 1 s− 1. All procedures were implemented in the program AFFINImeter (https://www.affinimeter.com/).

Get full Publication here.

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KinITC

 

KinITC: Obtain Thermodynamic and Kinetic Data from your ITC Measurements in just five clicks

In AFFINImeter we have implemented KinITC, this is a new method to obtain kinetic information from Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Data. With one single titration experiment it calculates the kinetic constants (kon and koff) and the thermodynamic data (KD and ΔH) of 1:1 binding interactions.

Global fitting: the key for a robust analysis

The Indian parable of “the six blind men and the elephant” tells the story of six blind men who touch an elephant in the hope of learning what it is like. As each one can only feel a different part of the animal the individual conclusions obtained are in disagreement and none of them provides a real view of the full elephant. “only by sharing what each of you knows can you possibly reach a true understanding”; that´s the moral behind this nice story.

The six blind men and the elephant: only a global analysis of the overall data provides a true understanding

Sometimes, when we perform two or more ITC titration experiments of a complex interacting system under different experimental conditions (i.e. different concentrations and/or experimental setup) we find out that the individual analysis of the corresponding isotherms yields different values of the thermodynamic parameters. This result can be very confusing, especially for newcomers in the field of molecular recognition, because all these experiments are a representation of the same interaction and should converge to provide the same information. Frequently, the explanation for this behaviour is that each individual ITC experiment lacks of sufficient information to unequivocally determine the thermodynamic parameters of the binding event. “It´s like feeling only a separate part of the elephant”.
Analogous to the parable of the six men and the elephant, the way to get a true understanding of the binding event consist of the global analysis of the different isotherms.
Being aware of the relevance of global analysis, in AFFINImeter we count with the possibility to perform Global fitting of multiple dataseries (isotherms) to tailored binding models where one or more fitting parameters are shared between isotherms. The number and identity of the parameters shared are selected by the user. Moreover, two or more parameters can be related trough mathematical relationships designed by the user. All these features make our global fitting tool the most potent among others to perform a robust analysis of ITC data of complex interactions.

Learn how to perform a global analysis with AFFINImeter:

AFFINImeter guest presenter of the Malvern webinar on advanced Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) data analysis

Webinar on advanced Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) data analysis

The AFFINImeter team are guest presenters of the Malvern webinar on advanced Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) data analysis. Together we will show how the latest advances in the field of ITC data analysis enable users to “squeeze” the ITC isotherm(s) to get more information than just thermodynamic data and to expand the range of applications of ITC. This webinar will be very helpful for ITC users studying complex interactions, for those who are having difficulties with their data analysis, or simply want to take their analysis to the next level. It is of special interest relevant for researchers from academia and industry working in biomedical applications, particularly in the area of drug design.

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Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of Molecular Recognition Processes

The understanding of molecular recognition processes requires a thorough examination from different perspectives including thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the binding interaction and structural aspects of the interactants and the complex.

The determination of the binding affinity of two (or more) interactants (i.e. a protein/ligand system), through a steady state analysis provides information on how strong is the complex formed, and it is typically expressed in terms of equilibrium binding constants (association, KA , or dissociation, KD constants). The kinetic analysis of the interaction offers information on how fast the complex is formed and how fast it dissociates, expressed in terms of association and dissociation rate constants, respectively (kon and koff).

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Global fitting analysis of a protein-ligand binding experiment

Global fitting analysis of a protein-ligand binding experiment

A few weeks ago AFFINImeter launched an Isothermal Titration data Analysis challenge of the analysis of a protein-ligand binding experiments. The participant had to globally analyze a set of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry experiments using AFFINImeter and get the thermodynamic and structural parameters of the interaction between both molecules (the receptor protein and the ligand).

The participants in this contest had the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to propose the right model for a given binding isotherm as well as to get the corresponding parameters upon fitting using AFFINImeter. On their side, less experienced participants had the opportunity to:

The results recently published by Henlz et al in [Methods 59 (2013) 336-348] were taken as a reference to generate the set of ITC isotherms selected for this contest.

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